Innovators

Searching for the Higgs Boson

By on May 14, 2013
cms-detector-sized.jpg Photograph by Maximilien Brice/CERN

Few will enter the walled dome that houses the ATLAS and CMS (seen here) experiment collaborations at CERN, the European organization for nuclear research, near Geneva on the French-Swiss border. Inside CERN's coveted Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator, scientists believed to have discovered a Higgs boson last year—the long sought-after subatomic particle that explains why all matter in the universe has mass and can experience forces. Often misleadingly referred to as “the God particle” because of its importance in understanding the structure of matter, the Higgs boson does not have any relationship to religion. The LHC was built largely to prove or disprove the existence of the Higgs boson. Photographs taken this year, supplied by CERN, provide a rare view inside the actual Hadron particle collider as well as a look at the spaces in CERN where other cutting-edge particle physics experiments are happening.

 
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