Customer Service Via Twitter

Customer Service Via Twitter

Increasingly, brands are becoming hip to Twitter. The free microblogging service allows users to send brief text updates to groups of people who have signed up to "follow" your messages. Launched in March 2007, Twitter was until now mainly the province of the technorati, many of whom post updates, known as tweets, about what they’re doing multiple times per day. Fans of Twitter say it makes a great way to stay in touch with friends.

Companies have figured out Twitter provides the opportunity to listen to what customers are saying about their brands, and to respond. Still, it’s not easy for a corporation to strike the right tone on Twitter. Some brands on Twitter seem too formal and stilted while others seem interested in using it only as a one-way PR channel. And then there’s the delicate issue of corporations following unsuspecting customers and responding to their complaints about brands. Even though the intentions are good, it might be a bit startling for customers to find out the folks from the brand are eavesdropping on their tweets.

It’s easy for brands to make mistakes on Twitter, but some are doing it right. With the following images, we’ve included the brands’ Twitter stats: the number of people they’re following and how many declared followers they’ve garnered as of Aug. 26. The number of favorites shows the brand's best-liked Twitterers while the number of updates refers to how many messages the brand has posted. Read on to find our favorites.